TITLE

Problems of Gathering Occupational Data by Mail

AUTHOR(S)
Gruskin, Denis M.
PUB. DATE
February 1968
SOURCE
Monthly Labor Review;Feb68, Vol. 91 Issue 2, p59
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Discusses the problems in gathering occupational data by mail in the United States. Deviation in employers' responses to survey questions; Need for utilization of supplementary survey methods.
ACCESSION #
5999521

 

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