TITLE

Injuries drop in OSHA crackdown on OR safety

PUB. DATE
April 2011
SOURCE
Hospital Employee Health;Apr2011, Vol. 30 Issue 4, p40
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article discusses how stringent inspections by the Tennessee Occupational Safety and Health Administration (TOSHA) over a five-year period concerning operating room (OR) safety dropped sharps injuries in hospitals and surgery centers. Also highlighted is the need to comply with laws requiring the use of safety needles in OR. Jan Cothron, manager of health compliance at TOSHA, highlights the activities undertaken to ensure compliance to the state law mandating the use of safety devices.
ACCESSION #
59966871

 

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