TITLE

Higher Pig Density Doesn't Pay

PUB. DATE
March 2011
SOURCE
National Hog Farmer;3/15/2011, Vol. 56 Issue 3, p20
SOURCE TYPE
Trade Publication
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article reports on the findings of the research conducted by Kansas State University (KSU), which states that average daily gain and average daily feed intake improve as the number of pigs in each pen was reduced.
ACCESSION #
59920479

 

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