TITLE

The thermodynamics of meniscus formation on wilhelmy plate immersion at the air/water interface and the mechanics of initial film deposition

AUTHOR(S)
Tumavitch, Nicholas J.; Cadenhead, D. Allan; Spencer, Brian J.
PUB. DATE
January 2000
SOURCE
AIP Conference Proceedings;2000, Vol. 504 Issue 1, p854
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The meniscus which forms when a solid is immersed in a liquid is supported by the upward acting surface tension of the liquid. Reducing the surface tension reduces the magnitude of the meniscus while reducing the gravitational pull will increase it. Edge effects can reduce the overall meniscus height, and the maximum height will only be achieved when the surface exceeds a minimum length. The shape of the meniscus at any point is given by an equation derived by minimizing the free energy of the system. From our observations of static menisci and our numerical study of the equations for the meniscus shape, we found that solids with identical sides will have identical menisci on each face, while solids where the width and the thickness differ will give a meniscus which will involve a contact angle change at and along the edge which can not be described by the classical theory. This observation has important implications for solid/liquid contact at corners in both normal and reduced gravity environments. Deposition of an insoluble film on the liquid surface results in a lowering of the surface tension and the size of the meniscus. If the solid surface is coated by a liquid film then the contact angle will not change during this process. Direct contact between the deposited film and the solid will give rise to a contact angle change. © 2000 American Institute of Physics.
ACCESSION #
5985026

 

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