TITLE

"I AM A BIT SICKENED": EXAMINING ARCHETYPES OF CONGRESSIONAL WAR CRIMES OVERSIGHT AFTER MY LAI AND ABU GHRAIB

AUTHOR(S)
BRENNER, SAMUEL
PUB. DATE
September 2010
SOURCE
Military Law Review;Fall2010, Vol. 205, p1
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article discusses the similarities in the U.S. congressional responses to My Lai and alleged war crimes in Vietnam in 1969 and the Abu Ghraib and alleged war crimes in Iraq in 2004. It argues that despite the different political situation during the Vietnam and Iraq wars, the history of congressional oversight of the alleged war crimes at My Lai and Abu Ghraib suggests the existence of seven archetypes of congressional oversight of war crimes including the Whistleblowers, the Muckracking Media and the Activated Public. It concludes that an examination and understanding of the archetypes of war crimes oversight can be useful for military investigators and prosecutors.
ACCESSION #
59563037

 

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