TITLE

Patients are harmed (again), fingers point. What's wrong?

AUTHOR(S)
Flemons, W. Ward; Davies, Jan M.
PUB. DATE
March 2011
SOURCE
CMAJ: Canadian Medical Association Journal;3/8/2011, Vol. 183 Issue 4, p520
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article focuses on the improvement of patient safety in Canada. It relates the report of a patient who has been misdiagnosed with breast cancer and undertaken needless surgery. It says that governments, health care providers and educators should reread the National Steering Committee on Patient Safety 2002 report to develop and maintain a culture of safety such as reporting, learning and flexible culture. Moreover, individuals who harm patients should be sanctioned.
ACCESSION #
59408881

 

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