TITLE

Patient preferences and treatment safety for uncomplicated vulvovaginal candidiasis in primary health care

PUB. DATE
January 2011
SOURCE
BMC Public Health;2011, Vol. 11 Issue 1, p63
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Background: Vaginitis is a common complaint in primary care. In uncomplicated candidal vaginitis, there are no differences in effectiveness between oral or vaginal treatment. Some studies describe that the preferred treatment is the oral one, but a Cochrane's review points out inconsistencies associated with the report of the preferred way that limit the use of such data. Risk factors associated with recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis still remain controversial. Methods/Design: This work describes a protocol of a multicentric prospective observational study with one year follow up, to describe the women's reasons and preferences to choose the way of administration (oral vs topical) in the treatment of not complicated candidal vaginitis. The number of women required is 765, they are chosen by consecutive sampling. All of whom are aged 16 and over with vaginal discharge and/or vaginal pruritus, diagnosed with not complicated vulvovaginitis in Primary Care in Madrid. The main outcome variable is the preferences of the patients in treatment choice; secondary outcome variables are time to symptoms relief and adverse reactions and the frequency of recurrent vulvovaginitis and the risk factors. In the statistical analysis, for the main objective will be descriptive for each of the variables, bivariant analysis and multivariate analysis (logistic regression). The dependent variable being the type of treatment chosen (oral or topical) and the independent, the variables that after bivariant analysis, have been associated to the treatment preference. Discussion: Clinical decisions, recommendations, and practice guidelines must not only attend to the best available evidence, but also to the values and preferences of the informed patient.
ACCESSION #
59162894

 

Related Articles

  • Patient preferences and treatment safety for uncomplicated vulvovaginal candidiasis in primary health care. Del-Cura González, Isabel; González, Francisca García-de-Blas; Cuesta, Teresa Sanz; Fernández, Jesús Martín; Del-Alamo Rodríguez, Justo M.; Ferrairo, Rosa A. Escriva; del Canto De-Hoyos Alonso, M.; Arenas, Laura Balsalobre; Barrientos, Ricardo Rodríguez; Wiesmann, Elisa Ceresuela; De-Alba Romero, Cristina; Díaz, Yolanda Ginés; Rodríguez-Moñino, Ana Pastor; Teira, Blanca Gutiérrez; del Pozo, Marta Sánchez-Celaya; Horcajuel // BMC Public Health;2011, Vol. 11 Issue 1, p63 

    Background: Vaginitis is a common complaint in primary care. In uncomplicated candidal vaginitis, there are no differences in effectiveness between oral or vaginal treatment. Some studies describe that the preferred treatment is the oral one, but a Cochrane's review points out inconsistencies...

  • Clinical Quiz.  // American Family Physician;2/15/2001, Vol. 63 Issue 4, p613 

    Presents medical questions based on the articles found in the February 15, 2001 issue of the `American Family Physician' magazine. Treatment of onychomycosis; Disability prevention principles in the primary care office; Evaluation of acute headaches in adults; Chronic vulvovaginal candidiasis;...

  • Vulvovaginitis Candidiasis Recurrence During Pregnancy. Fardiazar, Z.; Ronaci, F.; Torab, R.; Goldust, M. // Pakistan Journal of Biological Sciences;4/15/2012, Vol. 15 Issue 8, p399 

    Vulvovaginitis is the most common gynecologic condition seen by practitioners rendering primary care to women. Vulvovaginitis Candidiasis (VVC) is the most common type of vaginitis and this study aimed at specifying VVC recurrence during pregnancy. In this prospective study, 150 pregnant women...

  • Office Laboratory Diagnosis of Vaginitis. Ferris, Daron G.; Hendrich, Julie; Payne, Peter M.; Getts, Alan; Rassekh, Riaz; Mathis, Dianne; Litaker, Mark S. // Journal of Family Practice;Dec1995, Vol. 41 Issue 6, p575 

    This article evaluates routine clinician-performed office laboratory diagnostic techniques for women with abnormal vaginal symptoms. The traditional diagnosis of vaginitis incorporates patient symptoms, clinical findings observed during vaginal examination, and laboratory analysis of vaginal...

  • What to do about vaginal yeast infections.  // American Family Physician;5/15/1995, Vol. 51 Issue 7, p1723 

    Provides information on vaginal yeast infections. Causes; Treatment; Ways to prevent yeast infections.

  • Treatment Considerations for Bacterial Vaginosis and the Risk of Recurrence. Chen, Judy Y.; Tian, Haijun; Beigi, Richard H. // Journal of Women's Health (15409996);Dec2009, Vol. 18 Issue 12, p1997 

    Background: Recommended regimens for the treatment of bacterial vaginosis (BV) have similar efficacy; thus, the choice of treatment should consider additional factors such as risk of BV recurrence and side effect profile. The purpose of this study was to investigate BV recurrence rates and rates...

  • Splash attack! Marer, Eva; Walch, Abigail // Health (Time Inc. Health);Jul/Aug2002, Vol. 16 Issue 6, p162 

    Discusses the results of a study which focuses on vulvovaginal candidiasis or yeast infection. Factors that contribute to vaginal itch-and-burn during summer; Tips on how to prevent yeast infections.

  • Management of genital candidiasis. Denning, D.W.; Evans, E.G.V. // BMJ: British Medical Journal (International Edition);5/13/95, Vol. 310 Issue 6989, p1241 

    Focuses on the treatment of vaginal candidiasis caused by Candida albicans. Candidiasis in pregnant women; Symptoms of candidiasis; Clinical examination required for recurrent episodes; Topical treatment with nystatin or imidazole; Penile candidosis.

  • Practical management of chronic recurrent candidiasis. Meszaros, Liz // Dermatology Times;Nov95, Vol. 16 Issue 11, p50 

    Reports on a practical management strategy of chronic recurrent candidiasis. Differences in presentation of chronic candidiasis; Differential diagnosis through examination of vaginal discharge with KOH-positive vaginal smear; Use of vaginal creams in the management of vulvovaginal candidiasis;...

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of THE LIBRARY OF VIRGINIA

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics