TITLE

Burden of disease in Thailand: changes in health gap between 1999 and 2004

AUTHOR(S)
Bundhamcharoen, Kanitta; Odton, Patarapan; Phulkerd, Sirinya; Tangcharoensathien, Viroj
PUB. DATE
January 2011
SOURCE
BMC Public Health;2011, Vol. 11 Issue 1, p53
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Background: Continuing comprehensive assessment of population health gap is essential for effective health planning. This paper assessed changes in the magnitude and pattern of disease burden in Thailand between 1999 and 2004. It further drew lessons learned from applying the global burden of disease (GBD) methods to the Thai context for other developing country settings. Methods: Multiple sources of mortality and morbidity data for both years were assessed and used to estimate Disability-Adjusted Life Years (DALYs) loss for 110 specific diseases and conditions relevant to the country's health problems. Causes of death from national vital registration were adjusted for misclassification from a verbal autopsy study. Results: Between 1999 and 2004, DALYs loss per 1,000 population in 2004 slightly decreased in men but a minor increase in women was observed. HIV/AIDS maintained the highest burden for men in both 1999 and 2004 while in 2004, stroke took over the 1999 first rank of HIV/AIDS in women. Among the top twenty diseases, there was a slight increase of the proportion of non-communicable diseases and two out of three infectious diseases revealed a decrease burden except for lower respiratory tract infections. Conclusion: The study highlights unique pattern of disease burden in Thailand whereby epidemiological transition have occurred as non-communicable diseases were on the rise but burden from HIV/AIDS resulting from the epidemic in the 1990s remains high and injuries show negligent change. Lessons point that assessing DALY over time critically requires continuing improvement in data sources particularly on cause of death statistics, institutional capacity and long term commitments.
ACCESSION #
59162739

 

Related Articles

  • Regular exercise wards of common cold.  // Asian Pacific Post;11/11/2010, p5 

    The article focuses on a research study which found that the severity of common colds symptoms declined by 41% in people who were the fittest and by 31% in people who were most active, published in an issue of the "British Medical Journal."

  • Fujian flu more severe, but not unusual. Gagnon, Louise // CMAJ: Canadian Medical Association Journal;2/3/2004, Vol. 170 Issue 3, p325 

    Focuses on the virulence of the A/Fujian influenza strain reported in the first of month of 2004 in Canada. Number of people who died from influenza in the country by the end of 2003; Average number of children in Canada that die from influenza every year; Percentage of parents which get their...

  • WTC Workers and Volunteers Suffering from Array of Health Problems.  // Occupational Hazards;Oct2004, Vol. 66 Issue 10, p14 

    Discusses a study released on September 10, 2004 regarding health consequences of exposures sustained by workers and volunteers involved in the rescue and recovery operations in the World Trade Center in New York City. Illnesses experienced by the workers; Percentage of workers who experienced...

  • Soldiers and Oil Well Smoke. Schmidt, Charles W. // Environmental Health Perspectives;Nov2002, Vol. 110 Issue 11, pA690 

    Discusses the study by University of Iowa College of Public Health researchers published in 'Environmental Health Perspectives' journal, focusing on the respiratory health problems of Gulf War veterans who were exposed to oil-smoke during the war. Lack of evidence linking oil-smoke exposure to...

  • SARS scaled down.  // Australian Nursing Journal;Sep2003, Vol. 11 Issue 3, p13 

    Reports that Australian health authorities are scaling down measures for detecting and responding to the severe acute respiratory syndrome outbreak in September 2003.

  • Update: Influenza Activity -- United States, April 2-8, 2006.  // MMWR: Morbidity & Mortality Weekly Report;4/21/2006, Vol. 55 Issue 15, p431 

    Presents the results of a laboratory survey of influenza activities in the U.S. during April 2-8, 2006. Percentage of specimens testing positive for influenza; Deaths attributed to pneumonia and influenza; Outpatient visits for influenza-like illness; Assessment of human avian influenza A virus...

  • Legionnaires' Disease and the Traveller. Grist, N. R.; Reid, D.; Najera, R. // Annals of Internal Medicine;Apr79, Vol. 90 Issue 4, p563 

    Investigates the presence of Legionnaires' disease among members of a package tour to Benidorm, Spain, in 1973. Places where the patients were reported as having been abroad either during or shortly before their illness.

  • A STUDY TO ASSESS THE EFFECTIVENESS OF HOME BASED STEAM INHALATION THERAPY ON REDUCING THE SYMPTOMS OF ACUTE UPPER RESPIRATORY TRACT INFECTIONS AMONG UNDER FIVE CHILDREN IN RURAL KONANKUNTE; BANGALORE. ROSAMMA, V. J. // Golden Research Thoughts;Dec2012, Vol. 2 Issue 6, Special section p1 

    Infections of the respiratory tract are perhaps the most common human ailment. While they are a source of discomfort disability and loss of time for most adults, they are a substantial cause of morbidity in young children and the elderly. Many of these infections run their natural course in...

  • Solid fuel use and cooking practices as a major risk factor for ALRI mortality among African children. Rehfuess, E. A.; Tzala, L.; Best, N.; Briggs, D. J.; Joffe, M. // Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health;Nov2009, Vol. 63 Issue 11, p7 

    Background: Almost half of global child deaths due to acute lower respiratory infections (ALRIs) occur in sub-Saharan Africa, where three-quarters of the population cook with solid fuels. This study aims to quantify the impact of fuel type and cooking practices on childhood ALRI mortality in...

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of VIRGINIA BEACH PUBLIC LIBRARY AND SYSTEM

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics