TITLE

Women Have Better COPD Outcomes Than Men

PUB. DATE
February 2011
SOURCE
Pulmonary Reviews;Feb2011, Vol. 16 Issue 2, p24
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article reports that women have a higher survival rate from chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD) compared to men. A study of patients published in the January 2011 issue of "Thorax" magazine reveals that only 13 percent of women died from COPD while men accounted for 18 percent of deaths. Further investigation of the sexes show that longevity factors such as smaller airway lumens and thicker airway walls contribute to better survival of women with COPD.
ACCESSION #
58776137

 

Related Articles

  • Man Versus Woman: How COPD Affects the Sexes Differently. Dziedzic, Jessica // Pulmonary Reviews;Sep2007, Vol. 12 Issue 9, p6 

    The article discusses research being done on sex differences in severe pulmonary emphysema. It references a study by Fernando J. Martinez and colleagues published in the August 1, 2007 issue of the "American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine." It cites the findings that emphysema...

  • MINERVA.  // BMJ: British Medical Journal (Overseas & Retired Doctors Edition;10/31/2009, Vol. 339 Issue 7728, p1038 

    The article deals with several medical research and topics. Birmingham University researchers conclude that graduate students on fast track courses performed better than students on the five-year mainstream course. It is suggested by the current treatment guidelines of severe to very severe...

  • Long-term air pollution exposure and living close to busy roads are associated with COPD in women. Schikowski, Tamara; Sugiri, Dorothea; Ranft, Ulrich; Gehring, Ulrike; Heinrich, Joachim; Wichmann, H-Erich; Krämer, Ursula // Respiratory Research;2005, Vol. 6, p152 

    Background: Lung function and exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have been associated with short-term exposure to air pollution. However, the effect of long-term exposure to particulate matter from industry and traffic on COPD as defined by lung function has not been...

  • Medroxyprogesterone improves nocturnal breathing in postmenopausal women with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Saaresranta, Tarja; Aittokallio, Tero; Utriainen, Karri; Polo, Olli // Respiratory Research;2005, Vol. 6, p28 

    Background: Progestins as respiratory stimulants in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have been investigated in males and during wakefulness. However, sleep and gender may influence therapeutic responses. We investigated the effects of a 2-week medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA)...

  • Life in the COPD straitjacket: improving lives of sufferers. Booker, Rachel // British Journal of Nursing;10/9/2003, Vol. 12 Issue 18, p1061 

    Comments on the trend toward research that is focused on reducing exacerbation rates and health status declines for those afflicted with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in Great Britain. Licensing of combinations of inhaled corticosteroids and long-acting beta-2-agonists; Pulmonary...

  • What is the value of PET/CT for treatment response assessment in lymphoma? Ghesani, Munir; Talwar, Sumit; Becker, Kevin // Hem/Onc Today;3/10/2011, Vol. 12 Issue 5, p20 

    The article analyzes the medical images of a 69-year-old woman with history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), to determine the value of positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) for treatment response assessment in lymphoma.

  • Resistance vs aerobic exercise and COPD.  // Clinical Cardiology Alert;Feb2010 Supplement, Vol. 15 Issue 2, p4 

    The article discusses research being done on the effects of progressive resistance exercise on functionality in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, with reference to a study by S. O'Shea and colleagues in a 2009 issue of "Chest."

  • Exacerbations of COPD: Not so innocent. Kuritzky, Louis // Primary Care Reports;Jul2010 Clinical Briefs, p13 

    The article focuses on a research study by G. C. Donaldson et al., published in "Chest," which examined the toxicity of acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

  • Exacerbations of COPD: Not so innocent. Kuritzky, Louis // Clinical Oncology Alert;Jul2010 Supplement, p13 

    The article focuses on a research study by G. C. Donaldson et al., published in "Chest," which examined the toxicity of acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of VIRGINIA BEACH PUBLIC LIBRARY AND SYSTEM

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics