TITLE

Spanish/English Bilingual Listeners on Clinical Word Recognition Tests: What to Expect and How to Predict

AUTHOR(S)
Lu-Feng Shi; Sánchez, Diana
PUB. DATE
October 2010
SOURCE
Journal of Speech, Language & Hearing Research;Oct2010, Vol. 53 Issue 5, p1096
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Purpose: The current study was an attempt to provide initial evidence on how to predict the optimal language in which to conduct speech perception testing for Spanish/ English (S/E) bilingual listeners. Method: Thirty normal-hearing S/E listeners differing in age of language acquisition, length of immersion, daily language use, self-rated listening proficiency, and language dominance were evaluated on the English and Spanish word recognition tests in quiet and in speech-spectrum noise. Results: Performance on the English and Spanish tests was not correlated for any conditions. English word recognition was most significantly correlated with age of English acquisition. Logistic regression analyses further demonstrated age of English acquisition to be a good predictor of listeners' relative success on the 2 tests in quiet and at +6 dB signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). At 0 dB SNR, language dominance had the highest predictive specificity, whereas the combination of age of English acquisition and Spanish listening proficiency had the highest sensitivity. Conclusions: A Spanish word recognition test would likely yield more favorable results for S/E bilingual listeners who were Spanish-dominant or who acquired English at 10 years of age or older. It may be necessary for listeners who acquired English at 7-10 years of age to be evaluated in both English and Spanish.
ACCESSION #
58736608

 

Related Articles

  • SPEECH INTELLIGIBILITY DIFFERENCES ACROSS SOUND CLASSES WITH IN-THE-EAR AND FREE-FIELD MICROPHONES IN QUIET. ESTIS, JULIE M.; PARISI, JULIE A.; MOORE, ROBERT E.; BRUNGART, DOUGLAS S. // Perceptual & Motor Skills;Jun2011, Vol. 112 Issue 3, p845 

    Speech intelligibility performance with an in-the-ear microphone embedded in a custom-molded deep-insertion earplug was compared with results obtained using a free-field microphone. Intelligibility differences between microphones were further analyzed to assess whether reduced intelligibility...

  • Validating Models of Clinical Word Recognition Tests for Spanish/English Bilinguals. Lu-Feng Shi // Journal of Speech, Language & Hearing Research;Oct2014, Vol. 57 Issue 5, p1896 

    Purpose: Shi and Sánchez (2010) developed models to predict the optimal test language for evaluating Spanish/ English (S/E) bilinguals’ word recognition. The current study intended to validate their conclusions in a separate bilingual listener sample. Method: Seventy normal-hearing S/E...

  • How Linguistic Closure and Verbal Working Memory Relate to Speech Recognition in Noise–A Review. Besser, Jana; Koelewijn, Thomas; Zekveld, Adriana A.; Kramer, Sophia E.; Festen, Joost M. // Trends in Amplification;Jun2013, Vol. 17 Issue 2, p75 

    The ability to recognize masked speech, commonly measured with a speech reception threshold (SRT) test, is associated with cognitive processing abilities. Two cognitive factors frequently assessed in speech recognition research are the capacity of working memory (WM), measured by means of a...

  • Effects of Noise Suppression on Intelligibility: Experts' Opinions and Naïve Normal-Hearing Listeners' Performance. Hilkhuysen, Gaston L. M.; Gaubitch, Nikolay; Huckvale, Mark // Journal of Speech, Language & Hearing Research;Apr2013, Vol. 56 Issue 2, p404 

    Purpose: In this study, the authors investigated how well experts can adjust the settings of a commercial noise- reduction system to optimize the intelligibility for naive normal-hearing listeners. Method: In Experiment 1, 5 experts adjusted parameters for a noise-reduction system while aiming...

  • Bilingual Listeners' Perception of Temporally Manipulated English Passages. Shi, Lu-Feng; Farooq, Nadia // Journal of Speech, Language & Hearing Research;Feb2012, Vol. 55 Issue 1, p125 

    Purpose: The current study measured, objectively and subjectively, how changes in speech rate affect recognition of English passages in bilingual listeners. Method: Ten native monolingual, 20 English-dominant bilingual, and 20 non-English-dominant bilingual listeners repeated target words in...

  • Improving Speech Perception in Noise for Children with Cochlear Implants. Gifford, René H.; Olund, Amy P.; DeJong, Melissa // Journal of the American Academy of Audiology;Oct2011, Vol. 22 Issue 9, p623 

    Background: Current cochlear implant recipients are achieving increasingly higher levels of speech recognition; however, the presence of background noise continues to significantly degrade speech understanding for even the best performers. Newer generation Nucleus cochlear implant sound...

  • Subjective and Psychophysiological Indexes of Listening Effort in a Competing-Talker Task. Mackersie, Carol L.; Cones, Heather // Journal of the American Academy of Audiology;Feb2011, Vol. 22 Issue 2, p113 

    Background: The effects of noise and other competing backgrounds on speech recognition performance are well documented. There is less information, however, on listening effort and stress experienced by listeners during a speech-recognition task that requires inhibition of competing sounds....

  • Acceptable Noise Level and Psychophysical Masking. Rishiq, Dania A.; Harkrider, Ashley W.; Hedrick, Mark S. // American Journal of Audiology;Dec2012, Vol. 21 Issue 2, p199 

    Purpose: Individuals with low acceptable noise levels (ANLs) accept more noise than individuals with high ANLs. To determine whether ANL is influenced more by afferent or efferent cortical responsiveness, the authors measured differences in temporal masking responses between individuals with low...

  • Hearing Impaired Children's Preference for, and Performance with, Four Combinations of Directional Microphone and Digital Noise Reduction Technology. Pittman, Andrea L.; Hiipakka, Mollie M. // Journal of the American Academy of Audiology;Oct2013, Vol. 24 Issue 9, p832 

    Background: Before advanced noise-management features can be recommended for use in children with hearing loss, evidence regarding their ability to use these features to optimize speech perception is necessary. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the relation between children's...

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of VIRGINIA BEACH PUBLIC LIBRARY AND SYSTEM

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics