TITLE

Postcard: Copiapó

AUTHOR(S)
Nelsen, Aaron
PUB. DATE
February 2011
SOURCE
Time International (Atlantic Edition);2/21/2011, Vol. 177 Issue 7, p3
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article focuses on independent miners in Chile. It states that the percentage of fatalities in smaller mines is higher than in larger company mines but rarely comes under regulatory scrutiny. It comments that self-employed Chilean miner Juan Godoy discovered the Chañarcillo silver mine in 1832 and has inspired many other independent miners despite his dying in destitution. Chilean miner Aladino Olivares talks about how he considers the risks worthwhile as he is his own boss.
ACCESSION #
58607855

 

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