TITLE

Autotransfusion in cardiac surgery

AUTHOR(S)
Cross, M.
PUB. DATE
September 2001
SOURCE
Perfusion;Sep2001, Vol. 16 Issue 5, p391
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
There are a number of problems with allogeneic blood transfusion. Some of these problems are defined and can be quantified, such as the problem of rising cost or the risk of viral infection, but some of the problems are not well defined and it is only outcome data that point to allogeneic blood transfusion contributing to patient mortality and morbidity. Autotransfusion includes any technique in which the patient's own blood is collected, processed and stored, followed by reinfusion when circumstances dictate. In the perioperative period of cardiac surgery, a number of techniques are recognized as useful in this context. Preoperative autologous donation, with or without erythropoietin supplementation, intraoperative acute normovolaemic haemodilution, intraoperative cell salvage, postoperative cell salvage (reinfusion of shed mediastinal blood) and platelet rich plasmapheresis are all techniques which are used with more or less enthusiasm to reduce the need for an allogeneic blood transfusion. Modification of the priming technique of the cardiopulmonary bypass circuit using an autologous blood prime is included in this review even though it does not fall strictly within the definition of autotransfusion. Although autotransfusion is not the answer to every problem, there is no doubt that it should play a significant part in the strategy of blood conservation.
ACCESSION #
5842279

 

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