TITLE

THE UNREALIZED POTENTIAL OF PALEOETHNOBOTANY IN THE ARCHAEOLOGY OF NORTHWESTERN NORTH AMERICA: PERSPECTIVES FROM CAPE ADDINGTON, ALASKA

AUTHOR(S)
Lepofsky, Dana; Moss, Madonna L.; Lyons, Natasha
PUB. DATE
January 2001
SOURCE
Arctic Anthropology;2001, Vol. 38 Issue 1, p48
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Explores the potential contribution of paleoethnobotany in the archaeology of northwestern North America, based in paleoethnobotanical analysis of materials recovered from Cape Addington Rockshelter (49-CRG-188). Misconceptions about paleoethnobotany in northwestern North America; Site background of 49-CRG-188; Archaeobotanical remains identified from 4-9CRG-188; Evidence of plant use by site inhabitants.
ACCESSION #
5841956

 

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