British-Dutch labour history

September 1990
Labour History Review (Maney Publishing);Fall90, Vol. 55 Issue 2, p2
Academic Journal
The article presents information on some of the books issued by the International Institute of Social History in Amsterdam and presented at the biennial British-Dutch Conference on Labour History. One of the books is titled "Industrial Conflict," edited by Lex Heerma van Voss and Herman Diederiks. This volume examines industrial conflicts in Britain and the Netherlands between 1820 and today, with one excursion into the eighteenth century. Aspects dealt with include the strike propensity of different industries, the causes of strikes and the actions of trade unions and the state, as well as the role of immigrant labour and women, who have often been denounced as strikebreaking. Other forms of industrial conflict, such as lockouts, limitation of output and factory occupations, are not forgotten. In another book titled "Working Class and Popular Culture," the contributions to the British-Dutch Conference on Labour History collected and painted a vivid picture of those cultures and threw new light on the questions how and why they developed.


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