TITLE

How to empower adolescents: Guidelines for effective self-advocacy

AUTHOR(S)
Battle, Dorthy A.; Dickens-Wright, Lisa L.; Murphy, Sue C.
PUB. DATE
January 1998
SOURCE
Teaching Exceptional Children;Jan/Feb98, Vol. 30 Issue 3, p28
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Identifies three interrelated goals for teachers of adolescents who have learning disabilities with emphasis on communication. Information on placing students at the center of communication; Details on the use of portfolios; Detailed information on how to help students learn assessment and conference skills; How to involve parents in the education of students.
ACCESSION #
582526

 

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