TITLE

RUSSIA IN EASTERN EUROPE: HEGEMONY WITHOUT SECURITY

AUTHOR(S)
Byrnes, Robert F.
PUB. DATE
July 1971
SOURCE
Foreign Affairs;Jul1971, Vol. 49 Issue 4, p682
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article assesses the contribution of the states of Eastern Europe to Soviet Union's economic, technological and military power. The division of Europe and the perpetuation of tension have assisted the Soviet Union by restricting the role which West European states play in world politics and by increasing the U.S. burden. At the same time, the Soviet position provides a veto over the unification of Germany and also over the reconstruction of Europe as a whole. Soviet control over East Germany maintains the fear of another Russian-German alliance and provides opportunities for Soviet diplomacy. It almost guarantees crises over West Berlin, in circumstances the Soviets choose. In short, Eastern Europe remains at the heart of the struggle between the Soviet Union and member states of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization. The basic Soviet problem in Eastern Europe is simple: its military and political role is threatened by powerful economic, social and intellectual forces not susceptible to the controls which have proved effective in the Soviet Union. The Soviet position in Eastern Europe is an unstable one. Fundamentally, this reflects the conflict between the ideas concerning the ways in which societies should be organized and should deal with each other. No area in the world is more important than Eastern Europe in resolving these great issues, and none under Soviet hegemony is more precarious.
ACCESSION #
5806103

 

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