TITLE

THE AMERICAN QUARTER-CENTURY IN ASIA

AUTHOR(S)
Wilson, Dick
PUB. DATE
July 1973
SOURCE
Foreign Affairs;Jul1973, Vol. 51 Issue 4, p811
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
This article examines the political and economic presence of the U.S. in Asia since the 1950s. U.S. should derive satisfaction from their part in making this process possible, and one is hopeful that they will no longer feel rejected merely because their particular model of political life is not followed. If democracy is a good system, and if it suits the genius of a country, then nothing will stop it from emerging in the long run. You can try to save one country from another, and there can be nothing more honorable. But it is pretty hopeless, as a complete outsider, to try to save one element within a country from another unless the indigenous odds are at least even. The U.S. tried to do that in China as well as in Vietnam, and in so doing weakened the support which it was giving to the forces of freedom and progress in the other countries of East Asia, not disastrously, but measurably. The smaller non-Communist countries of Asia are more independent, and feel and know themselves to be more independent, than would have been possible without the postwar U.S. umbrella. That is the U.S. legacy to the region. Future generations of Asians will doubtless express gratitude for it even while they observe that its benefits could have been richer and speedier without the tragic mistakes over China and Vietnam.
ACCESSION #
5804947

 

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