TITLE

THE COMPLEXITIES OF NEGOTIATION

AUTHOR(S)
Cooper, Chester L.
PUB. DATE
April 1968
SOURCE
Foreign Affairs;Apr1968, Vol. 46 Issue 3, p454
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
This article presents information on the complexities involved in finding solution to the Vietnam War. One need to examine several critical preliminary factors which seem obvious when discussed, but which become increasingly befogged as one get down to actual cases. There is, first of all, the assumption, made explicitly by some and implicitly by others, that negotiations brings settlement. This assumption is not without some validity; once the negotiating process starts, the pressure of domestic opinion in the countries actively involved, and of international opinion generally, may force both sides to move toward an agreement. However, one should recognize that public pressure, whether domestic or external, will operate with more intensity and with more effectiveness on the U.S. side of the table than on theirs. This will not necessarily result in a "better," or a more lasting, final settlement. Moreover, those counting on domestic pressures to force the United States to water down its terms in order to reach an early agreement would do well to look at the recent swing of U.S. public opinion in the direction of a "hard" rather than a "soft" line, the pressure of the present mood of public opinion on American negotiators might result in a walkout rather than major concessions.
ACCESSION #
5804027

 

Related Articles

  • LETTERS TO THE EDITOR. Stump, Robert W.; Wheeler, Paul G.; Ennis, Robert J.; Contons, Albert J.; Burr, Barbara; Walters, Richard A.; Miesel, Sandra L. // America;2/17/1968, Vol. 118 Issue 7, p206 

    Several letters to the editor are presented in response to articles in previous issues including "How Far Is Up?" by Joseph F. Byrnes in the January 6, 1968 issue, "Vietnam as a Matter of Conscience" in the January 6, 1968 issue, and "Lets's Both Call a Halt―Now" in the January 20, 2008.

  • The Vietnam Era Antiwar Movement. Hall, Mitchell K. // OAH Magazine of History;Oct2004, Vol. 18 Issue 5, p13 

    Discusses the many forms that the antiwar movement took in the United States during the Vietnam War. Denial that there was a consensus among antiwar groups; Impact of the movement; Public acceptance of its message by 1967 even if it did not accept the messenger.

  • How To Win The War. Goldstein, Walter // New Republic;9/10/66, Vol. 155 Issue 11, p8 

    Calls for the U.S. government to prevent the escalation of the Vietnam War by initiating peace negotiations with South Vietnam's National Liberation Front and its allies from North Vietnam, China and the Soviet Union in 1966. Objective of the U.S. in committing to a Korea-type settlement...

  • How To Win The War. Goldstein, Walter // New Republic;9/10/66, Vol. 155 Issue 11, p8 

    Calls for the U.S. government to prevent the escalation of the Vietnam War by initiating peace negotiations with South Vietnam's National Liberation Front and its allies from North Vietnam, China and the Soviet Union in 1966. Objective of the U.S. in committing to a Korea-type settlement...

  • The memory won't fade.  // Newsweek;4/15/1985, Vol. 105 Issue 15, p34 

    It was the longest, saddest, baddest war America ever fought, the only war we ever lost. A look at the debates and controversies that have taken place since the fall of Saigon 10 years ago. There are a lot of `What ifs?' Includes a poll on current feelings about the Vietnam War.

  • Another lesson from Vietnam. Ivins, Molly // Indianapolis Business Journal;7/25/94, Vol. 15 Issue 17, Forefront p5C 

    Discusses lessons learned from the Vietnam War. Membership with the National Guard as a way of staying out of Vietnam; Former President George Bush's implication that a man who has not served in the Vietnam war is unfit to be president; Minimal attendance during the homecoming parade of Vietnam...

  • The Catholic Ultra-Resistance: Rhetorical Strategies of Anti-War Protest. Gustainis, J. Justin // Communicator (01935437);Spring83, Vol. 13, p37 

    The Catholic Ultra-Resistance employed a variety of rhetorical strategies to protest American involvement in Vietnam, ranging from nonviolent civil disobedience to attempts to destroy the effectiveness of the Selective Service System. The influences upon the strategic choices are discussed, as...

  • Flowers vs. BULLETS. Kowalski, Kathiann M. // Cobblestone;Nov/Dec2008, Vol. 29 Issue 9, p26 

    The article offers information on the move of anti-war protestors in voicing out their frustration over the U.S. involvement in the Vietnam War.

  • The Condition of War.  // Time;1/12/1970, Vol. 95 Issue 2, p10 

    The article focuses on the condition of the Vietnam War and ways to achieve peace.

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of VIRGINIA BEACH PUBLIC LIBRARY AND SYSTEM

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics