TITLE

THE POPULATION CRISIS: REASONS FOR HOPE

AUTHOR(S)
Notestein, Frank W.
PUB. DATE
October 1967
SOURCE
Foreign Affairs;Oct67, Vol. 46 Issue 1, p167
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article explores issues associated with population growth in developing nations in the 1960s. This discussion organized around two contrasting themes: one, of almost unrivaled dangers; the other, of new hope that it may be resolved during the remainder of this century. The center of this problem is that of slowing the rate of population growth sufficiently to permit the development of the lagging economies and of doing this in the next two or three decades. The low death rates come from another and less commonly recognized source of rapid population growth. To address this problem, the article suggests to develop national policies favoring family planning.
ACCESSION #
5803036

 

Related Articles

  • Family planning and population control in developing countries. Raulet, Harry M.; Raulet, H M // Demography;May1970, Vol. 7 Issue 2, p211 

    This essay aims at a critical analysis of the major assumptions of the family planning movement and their implications for population and development policy in the less developed countries. A neo-Malthusian perspective, in which a reduction of the current high rates of population growth is...

  • Population Control in Pakistan.  // Clinical Pediatrics;Aug1967, Vol. 6 Issue 8, p14 A 

    The article discusses the population control program in Pakistan. Kazi Anwartil Haq said that Pakistan's growing population would nullify economic growth if population control was not put into effect. Mortality had been reduced by such public health measures as improved sanitation, control of...

  • PROSPECTS FOR POPULATION CONTROL: REPLY. Bogue, Donald J. // American Journal of Agricultural Economics;Feb68, Vol. 50 Issue 1, p156 

    Answers a commentary regarding the prospects for population control. Contention on the prospects of population growth from 1970 to 1980; Opposition on the impression that the developing nations do not possess the capability to face demographic problems.

  • A note on measuring the independent impact of family planning programs on fertility declines. Hernandez, Donald J.; Hernandez, D J // Demography;Nov1981, Vol. 18 Issue 4, p627 

    This note critically evaluates recent cross-national studies that estimate the independent effect of family planning programs on the fertility of the developing world. The evaluation demonstrates that past research is biased to produce overestimates of net program impact. A new estimate is...

  • Malthus Does Cairo. Rubenstein, Ed // National Review;10/24/1994, Vol. 46 Issue 20, p18 

    This article raises the concern that population will outstrip the world's carrying capacity. Statistics from the United Nations show that the world population grew at 1.57 per cent annually from 1990 and 1994. But the good news is that the rate of population growth has decreased largely because...

  • PLANNING FOR ECONOMIC GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT POPULATION GROWTH, ECONOMIC GROWTH AND FAMILY PLANNING PROGRAMS IN LESS DEVELOPED COUNTRIES. Bower, Leonard G. // American Economist;Fall71, Vol. 15 Issue 2 

    Presents an abstract of a doctor dissertation on the relationship of economic growth with population growth and family planning programs in developing countries. Rate of economic growth per capital output; Demographic transition theory; Demand for contraceptives.

  • Third-world birth-control. MacLachlan, Suzanne; Siems, Shelby // Christian Science Monitor;5/16/95, Vol. 87 Issue 119, p2 

    Comments on a report by Population Action International suggesting teaching of third-world birth-control programs to men as well as women informing them of the risk of AIDS and other sexually transmitted diseases.

  • Now We Are six. Motavalli, Jim // E: The Environmental Magazine;Jul/Aug99, Vol. 10 Issue 4, p28 

    Discusses information on world population. Data on world population in developing and developed countries; Cause of population momentum; Family planning assistance in developing countries; Predictions of a population deficit.

  • THE ECONOMIC CASE for BIRTH CONTROL In Underdeveloped Nations. Enke, Stephen // Challenge (05775132);May/Jun67, Vol. 15 Issue 5, p30 

    Demographers have been warning governments of the population explosion for almost a decade, with little result. Perhaps the coming famine in India may finally persuade the governments of poor countries to adopt vigorous measures including the payment of bonuses to induce couples to have fewer...

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of THE LIBRARY OF VIRGINIA

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics