TITLE

CHINA'S NEXT PHASE

AUTHOR(S)
Elegant, Robert S.
PUB. DATE
October 1967
SOURCE
Foreign Affairs;Oct67, Vol. 46 Issue 1, p137
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
This article analyzes the future shape of China that could arise from the forging of a moral consensus acceptable to its citizens. The Red Guards began by supporting the Maoists without reservation. But, as they became aware of their own intellectual and physical powers, they tended to carve out new positions which the essentially authoritarian Maoist leadership found extremely antipathetic. A host of outside factors could vitally influence the future course of China. The Nationalists, for example, might seek to reassert their authority.
ACCESSION #
5803015

 

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