TITLE

NATO AFTER THE INVASION

AUTHOR(S)
Cleveland, Harlan
PUB. DATE
January 1969
SOURCE
Foreign Affairs;Jan1969, Vol. 47 Issue 2, p251
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
This article focuses on the response of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) to the invasion of Czechoslovakia by the Soviet Union in August 1968. The first reaction of the NATO to the mounting Czech crisis--before the invasion--was to watch carefully but lie low. When the Russians struck, NATO was readier for round-the-clock crisis management than it had ever been before. For one thing, when the political headquarters of the NATO was moved from Paris, France to Brussels, Belgium in October 1967, the North Atlantic Council decided to build into the new headquarters a modern Situation Room, complete with up-to-date visual aids and serviced by a NATO-wide communication system. But behind the scenes the invasion had brought into being a NATO work program of impressive and exhausting scope--a book of lessons learned from the invasion about Soviet logistics and mobility and tactics, a special inquiry into the warning issue. Somewhat to the surprise of NATO nations, the U.S. government passed an initiative back to them: a great gathering of NATO ministers would be useful only when each government had had time to give its allies concrete indications of what it thought it could do to enhance its contribution to the NATO defense system.
ACCESSION #
5800861

 

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