TITLE

APPROACHING CHINA, DEFENDING TAIWAN

AUTHOR(S)
Ravenal, Earl C.
PUB. DATE
October 1971
SOURCE
Foreign Affairs;Oct71, Vol. 50 Issue 1, p44
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
This article examines the implications of a defense arrangement by the U.S. with Taiwan for the recognition of the governments and states of China, as of October 1971. U.S. responsibility for the defense of Taiwan began with the decision of U.S. President Harry S. Truman, on June 27, 1950, three days after the outbreak of the Korean War, to interpose the Seventh Fleet in the Taiwan Strait, protecting the island from the communists and barring the nationalists from offensive actions against mainland China. It has been suggested that our contribution to the defense of Taiwan should be cancelled as part of a program to cut the costs of overseas deployments. An assessment of cost depends on the way one looks at the question. Current U.S. military expenditures in Taiwan, though not negligible in absolute terms, are minor in comparison with those in other countries on the periphery of China. If we were to abandon our defense arrangement on Taiwan, what would be the effects on the pattern of regional security? There are two aspects, the efficacy of deterrence, and the will and allegiance of our allies, particularly Japan. Such a reversal of policy in this situation would have transcendent significance for our international role. First, it would imply a renunciation of the Dulles syndrome of containment, treaties and counter-ideology. Second, it would suggest an alternative American disposition toward the balance of power. Third, our removal of force from Taiwan, this extreme outpost in the Western Pacific, would indicate the adoption of second chance military strategies. Fourth, an abandonment of our defense commitment to Taiwan would mark a revulsion against the seductive logic of deterrence. Finally, abrogation of our alliance with the Republic of China would prefigure a repudiation of the obsolescent wisdom of collective security.
ACCESSION #
5800645

 

Related Articles

  • U.S.-SPANISH RELATIONS.  // Background Notes on Countries of the World: Spain;Jun2006, p6 

    The chapter looks at the status of the U.S.-Spain diplomatic relations. The two countries have a long history of official relations and are closely associated in many fields. Aside from the countries' cooperation in the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, defense and security relations between...

  • FAREWELL TO ARMS CONTROL? Nye Jr., Joseph S. // Foreign Affairs;Fall86, Vol. 65 Issue 1, p1 

    Focuses on the 1986 meetings between the U.S. and the Soviet Union and its implications for arms control. Specific issues of strategic arms control to be discussed; Reluctance of the U.S. to adhere to the second Strategic Arms Limitation Talks (SALT II) treaty; Impact of the issue of arms...

  • DEFENSE.  // Background Notes on Countries of the World: Republic of Slovenia;Dec2007, p7 

    The article reports developments related to defense in Slovenia. A major reorganization was implemented by the Slovene Armed Forces from 2003 to 2005 to change from a conscription-based territorial defense force to a professional, deployable and combat capable military with North Atlantic Treaty...

  • FAREWELL TO ARMS CONTROL? Nye Jr., Joseph S. // Foreign Affairs;Fall1986, Vol. 65 Issue 1, p1 

    Focuses on the 1986 meetings between the U.S. and the Soviet Union and its implications for arms control. Specific issues of strategic arms control to be discussed; Reluctance of the U.S. to adhere to the second Strategic Arms Limitation Talks (SALT II) treaty; Impact of the issue of arms...

  • Month-long U.S. exercise with strategic ally Georgia rattles Moscow; Russia conducts large unannounced air-sea exercise in Black Sea; Iran, North Korea and Syria blocked U.N treaty on arms trade.  // Geo-Strategy Direct;4/10/2013, p1 

    The article offers world news briefs. It reports a month-long military exercise codenamed, Agile Spirit 2013, which participated by some 350 American marines from the U.S. Marine Corps (USMC) and several hundred Georgian Army troops. After knowing the move, Russian President Vladimir Putin has...

  • FAREWELL TO ARMS CONTROL? Nye Jr., Joseph S. // Foreign Affairs;Fall1986, Vol. 65 Issue 1, p1 

    Focuses on the 1986 meetings between the U.S. and the Soviet Union and its implications for arms control. Specific issues of strategic arms control to be discussed; Reluctance of the U.S. to adhere to the second Strategic Arms Limitation Talks (SALT II) treaty; Impact of the issue of arms...

  • FAREWELL TO ARMS CONTROL? Nye Jr., Joseph S. // Foreign Affairs;Fall1986, Vol. 65 Issue 1, p1 

    Focuses on the 1986 meetings between the U.S. and the Soviet Union and its implications for arms control. Specific issues of strategic arms control to be discussed; Reluctance of the U.S. to adhere to the second Strategic Arms Limitation Talks (SALT II) treaty; Impact of the issue of arms...

  • FAREWELL TO ARMS CONTROL? Nye Jr., Joseph S. // Foreign Affairs;Fall1986, Vol. 65 Issue 1, p1 

    Focuses on the 1986 meetings between the U.S. and the Soviet Union and its implications for arms control. Specific issues of strategic arms control to be discussed; Reluctance of the U.S. to adhere to the second Strategic Arms Limitation Talks (SALT II) treaty; Impact of the issue of arms...

  • FAREWELL TO ARMS CONTROL? Nye Jr., Joseph S. // Foreign Affairs;Fall1986, Vol. 65 Issue 1, p1 

    Focuses on the 1986 meetings between the U.S. and the Soviet Union and its implications for arms control. Specific issues of strategic arms control to be discussed; Reluctance of the U.S. to adhere to the second Strategic Arms Limitation Talks (SALT II) treaty; Impact of the issue of arms...

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of THE LIBRARY OF VIRGINIA

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics