TITLE

CUBA, CASTRO AND THE UNITED STATES

AUTHOR(S)
Bonsal, Philip W.
PUB. DATE
January 1967
SOURCE
Foreign Affairs;Jan1967, Vol. 45 Issue 2, p260
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
This article looks at the decline of the popularity of the regime of Cuban leader Fidel Castro and its foreign relations with the U.S. government. As the prestige of Castro's regime continue to decline Cuban people may be confronted with real political choices and the U.S. may once again have to deal with the question of relations with Cuba. From the outbreak of the U.S. war with Spain in 1898 to the suspension of our quota for Cuban sugar in 1960, the U.S. exercised a major influence on the economic and political development of Cuba. Judgment of that influence is broadly divided between traditional and revisionist schools of thought. In the fashion of conventional wisdoms, each of these views over the years has incorporated a fair number of fallacies and myths. In the traditional view, U.S. military intervention was the deciding factor in the independence of Cuba. At a sizable cost in blood and treasure, the U.S. freed an oppressed and mistreated people from a harsh, backward tyranny and set it on the road to self-government. In like manner, other major episodes in the relations between the two countries have been contrastingly interpreted. The traditionalists and the revisionists agree on one point: that the influence of the U.S. in Cuba or the threat of it whether as a generous benefactor and wise counselor or as a neo-colonialist exploiter has limited the ability of the Cubans to make their own decisions in many matters theoretically the exclusive concern of a sovereign state.
ACCESSION #
5800313

 

Related Articles

  • Lessons of the Cuban Blunder. Halle, Louis J. // New Republic;6/5/61, Vol. 144 Issue 23, p13 

    Comments on U.S. foreign policy towards Cuba. Lessons to be learned from previous administrations' attempt to secretly arm and train Cuban rebels to possibly overthrow Fidel Castro's regime and invade Cuba; Question of action or inaction on the threat posed by Cuba, which is drifting to the...

  • Our man in Havana. Williams, Armstrong // New York Amsterdam News;8/17/2006, Vol. 97 Issue 34, p13 

    The article discusses the author's views on the dictatorship of Cuba. The U.S. has never been an innocent bystander in the affairs of Cuba. People in the U.S. should resist the temptation to gloat over Cuban President Fidel Castro's imminent demise as the rumors of the person's impending...

  • WALTER LIPPMANN. Smith, Howard K. // New Republic;6/26/61, Vol. 144 Issue 26, p7 

    Presents an interview of Walter Lippmann in the U.S. Views on the possibility of American democracy competing with Soviet and Chinese dictatorship; Views on the reasons to justify foreign aid; Views on U.S. foreign policy towards Cuba and Fidel Castro.

  • WALTER LIPPMANN. Smith, Howard K. // New Republic;6/26/61, Vol. 144 Issue 26, p7 

    Presents an interview of Walter Lippmann in the U.S. Views on the possibility of American democracy competing with Soviet and Chinese dictatorship; Views on the reasons to justify foreign aid; Views on U.S. foreign policy towards Cuba and Fidel Castro.

  • Circus in Town.  // Time;Feb1960, Vol. 75 Issue 5, p30 

    The article reports on the late-night interview show "The Television World Asks" with Cuban socialist leader Fidel Castro. It states that he was talking about the ramble that the U.S. and Spanish embassies had been helping Cubans to get out of the country. It mentions the incident where the...

  • Cuba: Guide to Critical Analysis.  // Points of View: Cuba;9/30/2016, p4 

    The article offers a critical guide to the controversial issues concerning the communist nation of Cuba and its leader Fidel Castro. The article discusses criteria in understanding the issue, such as distinguishing between fact and opinion and recognizing point and counterpoint arguments. Also...

  • The Great Divide. Cabral, Elena // Scholastic News -- Edition 5/6;9/18/2006, Vol. 75 Issue 3, p4 

    The article explores how the illness of Cuba President Fidel Castro has focused attention on the country's relations with the U.S. When former refugee Elián González wrote a get-well letter to the ailing Castro, it made headlines in both Cuba and the U.S. Despite the countries' unstable...

  • WASHINGTON AND HAVANA: TIME FOR DIALOGUE. Smith, Wayne S. // World Policy Journal;Summer90, Vol. 7 Issue 3, p557 

    This article discusses the reluctance of U.S. President George W. Bush to deal with the Cuban government. One reason for the U.S. administration's reluctance is its apparent expectation that Cuban President Fidel Castro is not likely to endure for long. Castro's popularity has waned as economic...

  • Keeping Cool About Cuba. Shapiro, Samuel // New Republic;8/8/60, Vol. 143 Issue 6, p8 

    Discusses relations between Cuba and the U.S. Examples of misinterpretation of actions by both the Cuban and the U.S. government; Reasons for deteriorating relations between the two; Impact of the cut in sugar quota because of the relations, on both the countries and the Soviet Union; Clash of...

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of VIRGINIA BEACH PUBLIC LIBRARY AND SYSTEM

Sign out of this library

Other Topics