TITLE

HOW TO WIN THE WAR ON DRUGS Victory begins and ends at home. Washington should stop focusing on curbing the supply from abroad and put more money into programs that reduce demand in the U.S

AUTHOR(S)
Kraar, Louis; Kretchmar, Laurie
PUB. DATE
March 1990
SOURCE
Fortune;3/12/1990, Vol. 121 Issue 6, p70
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
No abstract available.
ACCESSION #
57868702

 

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