TITLE

A QUANTUM LEAP IN ELECTRONICS A famous and paradoxical theory of modern physics may set off a transformation as profound as the one begun 40 years ago when transistors replaced vacuum tubes

AUTHOR(S)
Bylinsky, Gene; Moore, Alicia Hills
PUB. DATE
January 1989
SOURCE
Fortune;1/30/1989, Vol. 119 Issue 3, p113
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
No abstract available.
ACCESSION #
57866997

 

Related Articles

  • The Vacuum as Ether in the Last Century. Barone, M. // Foundations of Physics;Dec2004, Vol. 34 Issue 12, p1973 

    In this paper we review the evolution of the concept of “vacuum” according to different theories formulated in the last century, like Quantum Mechanics, Quantum Electrodynamics, Quantum Chromodynamics in Particle Physics and Cosmology. In all these theories a metastable vacuum state...

  • TRANSISTOR RADIOS THE BUYABLE PAST. Lander, David // American Heritage;Mar2004, Vol. 55 Issue 1, p14 

    Next year marks the fiftieth anniversary of the transistor radio, which, like the diminutive electronic component it's named for, was invented in America. Using smaller solid-state devices in place of vacuum tubes, transistor radios could be scaled down considerably, yet the earliest versions...

  • Cathode Rays.  // World Book Science Dataset;1/1/2009, p1 

    Cathode Rays, in physics, a stream of electrons given off by the negative electrode, or cathode, of a vacuum tube. A cathode-ray tube (CRT) consists of an electron gun for emitting the electrons; deflecting plates for focusing the rays; and a screen, coated with a material such as zinc sulfide...

  • Observation of the dynamical Casimir effect in a superconducting circuit. Wilson, C. M.; Johansson, G.; Pourkabirian, A.; Simoen, M.; Johansson, J. R.; Duty, T.; Nori, F.; Delsing, P. // Nature;11/17/2011, Vol. 479 Issue 7373, p376 

    One of the most surprising predictions of modern quantum theory is that the vacuum of space is not empty. In fact, quantum theory predicts that it teems with virtual particles flitting in and out of existence. Although initially a curiosity, it was quickly realized that these vacuum fluctuations...

  • The incredible shrinking computer. Csatari, Jeff // Boys' Life;Jul92, Vol. 82 Issue 7, p28 

    Comments on the decreasing size of computers which were invented less than 50 years ago. The size of the first computer filled a huge room; In the 1950s transistors replaced vacuum tubes making them smaller; What computers will be like in the future.

  • Quantum vacuum noise in physics and cosmology. Davies, P. C. W. // Chaos;Sep2001, Vol. 11 Issue 3 

    The concept of the vacuum in quantum field theory is a subtle one. Vacuum states have a rich and complex set of properties that produce distinctive, though usually exceedingly small, physical effects. Quantum vacuum noise is familiar in optical and electronic devices, but in this paper I wish to...

  • It was 40 years ago today.  // Machine Design;5/25/95, Vol. 67 Issue 10, p136 

    Reports on an article published in the May 1955 issue of Machine Design periodical. Success of transistors in replacing high-power vacuum tubes.

  • Walter Houser Brattain.  // Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia, 6th Edition;Feb2013, p1 

    Brattain, Walter Houser, 1902–87, American physicist, b. Xiamen, China, Ph.D. Univ. of Minnesota, 1929. He was a researcher at Bell Laboratories in Murray Hill, N.J. from 1929 to 1967. He then taught at Whitman College in Walla Walla, Wash., until he retired in 1972. Brattain, William...

  • Walter Houser Brattain.  // Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia, 6th Edition;Q1 2017, p1 

    Brattain, Walter Houser, 1902–87, American physicist, b. Xiamen, China, Ph.D. Univ. of Minnesota, 1929. He was a researcher at Bell Laboratories in Murray Hill, N.J. from 1929 to 1967. He then taught at Whitman College in Walla Walla, Wash., until he retired in 1972. Brattain, William...

  • electron tube.  // American Heritage Student Science Dictionary;2009, p113 

    The entry describes an electron tube. It is a sealed glass tube containing either a vacuum or a small amount of gas, in which electrons move from a negatively charged electrode to a positively charged one. With the application and varying of an electric or magnetic field, the direction and...

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of THE LIBRARY OF VIRGINIA

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics