TITLE

Chapter One: INTRODUCTION

AUTHOR(S)
Gelfand, Scott
PUB. DATE
January 2006
SOURCE
Ectogenesis;2006, p1
SOURCE TYPE
Book
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Chapter 1 of the book "Ectogenesis: Artificial Womb Technology and the Future of Human Reproduction" is presented which discusses various topics published within the book concerning ectogenesis, including the development of ectogenetic technology, the moral permissibility of ectogenesis, and the impact of ectogenesis on abortion issue.
ACCESSION #
57738668

 

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