TITLE

Clement Barksdale, Translator of Grotius: Erastianism and Episcopacy in the English Church, 1651-1658

AUTHOR(S)
Barducci, Marco
PUB. DATE
October 2010
SOURCE
Seventeenth Century;Autumn2010, Vol. 25 Issue 2, p265
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
While recent scholarship has studied the influence of Hobbes's Erastianism on the religious politics of the Interregnum, very little attention has been paid to the equally important influence of the works of Grotius on the English debate about the relations between State, Church, and religion. This article focuses on Clement Barksdale's translations of Grotius (De impero, De veritate, De iure), which aimed to provide post-Laudian Anglicanism with a new foundational ideology that was Erastian, Arminian, moderate, and irenicist. This project is closely linked to surviving members of the Great Tew circle, who were keenly interested in Grotius's ideas. It also provoked the opposition of Richard Baxter, who attempted to counter the 'Grotian religion' in a series of publications of the later 1650s. Finally, the article considers the continuity of the Grotian tradition, and the lasting influence of Grotius's thought, after the Restoration.
ACCESSION #
57556186

 

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