TITLE

Frontier Life: Late Prehistoric Adaptations of the Kansas City Locality

AUTHOR(S)
Logan, Brad
PUB. DATE
October 2010
SOURCE
Midcontinental Journal of Archaeology (Rowman & Littlefield Publ;Fall2010, Vol. 35 Issue 2, p229
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article discusses the Late Prehistoric Steed-Kisker and Pomona Indian archeological cultures in what the author calls the Kansas City locality near the lower Missouri River. It particularly examines archaeological evidence from excavation sites known as the Scott and Caenen sites in the Stranger Creek valley of Kansas. The author comments on several artifacts, including stone tools and ceramics. Other topics include the Central Plains tradition (CPt) adaptation form and the possibility of acculturation or assimilation with the Oneota Indian tradition.
ACCESSION #
56673019

 

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