TITLE

USDA border inspections to curtail spread of citrus greening into Texas and California

AUTHOR(S)
Hawkes, Logan
PUB. DATE
December 2010
SOURCE
Southwest Farm Press;12/16/2010, Vol. 37 Issue 24, p10
SOURCE TYPE
Trade Publication
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article reports on the move of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) to conduct border inspections across the country regarding outbreaks of citrus greening in Asia. It indicates that the move of the USDA is intended to diminish the threat of infected citrus plants to cross the ports of entry in Mexico. Moreover, it mentions that the USDA will start the border inspections over the holiday season.
ACCESSION #
56636936

 

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