TITLE

Persistence of Both Peripheral and Non-Peripheral Corneodesmosomes in the Upper Stratum Corneum of Winter Xerosis Skin Versus only Peripheral in Normal Skin

AUTHOR(S)
Simon, Michel; Bernard, Dominique; Minondo, Anne-Marie; Camus, Christiane; Fiat, Françoise; Corcuff, Pierre; Schmidt, Rainer; Serre, Guy
PUB. DATE
January 2001
SOURCE
Journal of Investigative Dermatology;Jan2001, Vol. 116 Issue 1, p23
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
SummaryTo understand the biochemical abnormalities that underlie the reduced desquamation observed in dry skin, we analyzed corneodesmosome degradation in normal and winter xerosis skin. Western blotting of total proteins from corneocytes obtained by varnish-strippings from the legs of 56 volunteers with normal (26) or xerotic (30) skin was performed using antibodies specific for (corneo)desmosome proteins. In the whole population, the amounts of desmoglein 1 and plakoglobin were found to be correlated, but were not related to the amounts of corneodesmosin. This suggests simultaneous proteolysis for the former proteins differing from that of corneodesmosin. Neither entire desmoplakins nor any proteolysis-derived fragments were detected. The amounts of corneodesmosin, desmoglein 1, and plakoglobin detected were found to be significantly higher in xerotic compared with normal skin extracts. Conventional and freeze-fracture electron microscopy showed the absence of nonperipheral corneodesmosomes in the upper stratum corneum of normal skin but the presence of a significant number of these structures in the same layer of winter xerosis skin. These results provide a more precise description of the proteolysis of corneodesmosome components in the upper cornified layer of the epidermis. They support previous studies demonstrating the importance of corneodesmosome degradation in desquamation and reveal that the nonperipheral corneodesmosomes, which are totally degraded during maturation of the stratum corneum in normal skin, persist in winter xerosis, probably leading to abnormal desquamation.
ACCESSION #
5661540

 

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