TITLE

Spoken Word Recognition in School-Age Children With SLI: Semantic, Phonological, and Repetition Priming

AUTHOR(S)
Velez, Melinda; Schwartz, Richard G.
PUB. DATE
December 2010
SOURCE
Journal of Speech, Language & Hearing Research;Dec2010, Vol. 53 Issue 6, p1616
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Purpose: The purpose of this studywas to contribute to the current understanding of how children with specific language impairment (SLI) organize their mental lexicons. The study examined semantic and phonological priming in children with and without SLI. Method: Thirteen children (7;0-11;3 [years;months]) with SLI and 13 age-matched children with typical language development participated in this study. Prime-target pairs (semantic, phonological, and repetition) were embedded within a running list of words so that the actual pairs were imperceptible. Reaction times to an animacy judgment (alive vs. not alive) were analyzed. The experiment featured 500-ms and 1,000-ms interstimulus intervals (ISIs) between primes and targets. Results: Children with SLI exhibited priming effects in the repetition condition at both ISIs; however, phonological and semantic effects were absent. Typically developing children exhibited effects in the repetition at both ISIs. Semantic and phonological effects were absent at 500 ms ISIs, but present at 1,000 ms ISIs. Conclusions: Although children with SLI have priming mechanisms similar to those of their age-matched peers, the absence of semantic and phonological priming suggests that these connections are not strong enough by themselves to yield priming effects. These findings are discussed in the context of semantic and phonological priming, representation, and generalized slowing.
ACCESSION #
55714296

 

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