TITLE

Multipeak negative-differential-resistance device by combining single-electron and metal–oxide–semiconductor transistors

AUTHOR(S)
Inokawa, Hiroshi; Fujiwara, Akira; Takahashi, Yasuo
PUB. DATE
November 2001
SOURCE
Applied Physics Letters;11/26/2001, Vol. 79 Issue 22, p3618
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
A multipeak negative-differential-resistance device is proposed. The device comprises a single-electron transistor (SET) and a metal–oxide–semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET), and can, in principle, generate an infinite number of current peaks. Operation of the proposed device is verified at 27 K with a SET fabricated by the pattern-dependent oxidation process and a MOSFET on the same silicon-on-insulator wafer. Six current peaks and a peak-to-valley current ratio of 2.1 are obtained, and multiple-valued memory operation is successfully demonstrated. © 2001 American Institute of Physics.
ACCESSION #
5559046

 

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