TITLE

5 myths that might wrongly keep you from bankruptcy

AUTHOR(S)
Callahan, Jesse
PUB. DATE
November 2010
SOURCE
Inside Tucson Business;11/29/2010, Vol. 20 Issue 26, p17
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article discusses the five common myths concerning bankruptcy. It says that debtors think that they will automatically lose their house once they file for bankruptcy. It mentions that the mortgage debt will be forgiven once a short sale has been approved by the lender. It also states that debtors think that it is better to settle their credit card than to discharge it.
ACCESSION #
55528488

 

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