TITLE

Trying in vain to be cool in Slovak

AUTHOR(S)
Reynolds, Matthew J.
PUB. DATE
October 2001
SOURCE
Slovak Spectator;10/15/2001, Vol. 7 Issue 39, p15
SOURCE TYPE
Newspaper
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Presents English words which do not have satisfactory equivalents in the Slovak language. Number of words in the Slovak language; Terms which indirectly mean 'cool' in the Slovak language; Slovak words for 'dorky' and 'geek.'
ACCESSION #
5530064

 

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