TITLE

Factor V[sup LEIDEN] and cardiopulmonary bypass: investigation of haemostatic parameters and the effect of aprotinin using an ex vivo model

AUTHOR(S)
Linden, M.; Schneider, M.; Erber, W.
PUB. DATE
November 2001
SOURCE
Perfusion;Nov2001, Vol. 16 Issue 6, p476
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
It has been suggested that aprotinin results in significantly increased risk for perioperative thrombotic complications in patients with Factor V[sup LEIDEN] (F5L) due to its ability to competitively inhibit activated protein C (APC) function in vitro. No clinical studies have been performed to assess the effect of aprotinin on APC function of F5L in vivo. We developed an ex vivo model to mimic the effects of cardiopulmonary bypass with the exclusion of the patient in order to assess APC function. Blood from normal (n = 2) and F5L heterozygous donors (n = 2) was treated with aprotinin or placebo (saline). The blood was heparinized, added to the prime and circulated at 2 l/min through a modified cardiopulmonary bypass circuit. After 60 min of circulation, the heparin was neutralized with protamine sulfate. Blood samples, drawn at specific time points, were analysed for APC ratio. Results showed a decrease in APC ratio for both F5L and normal bloods with the addition of aprotinin (18% and 40%, respectively). APC ratios also decreased with the commencement of extracorporeal circulation for all bloods, resulting in an APC ratio of 1.35 in normal placebo-treated blood and 0.67 in F5L placebo-treated blood. The combined effect of aprotinin and extracorporeal circulation resulted in APC ratios of 0.90 for normal blood and 0.63 for F5L blood, corresponding to a severe dysfunction of APC intraoperatively (reference range 1.9--4.0). The data from this model predict an increased risk of perioperative thrombosis due to inhibition of APC function in cardiac surgical patients heterozygous for the F5L mutation. Aprotinin further compounds the severity of APC dysfunction, though the effect is more severe in normal blood. The ex vivo model employed was an effective tool for the investigation of the haemostatic effect of aprotinin. This model may be exploited for other applications such as the investigation of novel or emerging haemostatic agents prior to clinical trial.
ACCESSION #
5529015

 

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