TITLE

Neuroprotection during cardiac surgery: strategies to reduce cognitive decline

AUTHOR(S)
Whitaker, D C; Stygall, J; Newman, S P
PUB. DATE
March 2002
SOURCE
Perfusion;Mar2002 Supplement, Vol. 17 Issue 2S, p69
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Although the population receiving cardiac surgery is older and therefore more prone to cognitive deterioration, these difficulties have declined over the last ten years. It is likely that the multiple changes introduced to cardiac surgery over time have had a cumulative benefit in protecting the brain. The most likely causes of cognitive difficulties are microemboli delivered to the brain during surgery, altered cerebral perfusion and an inflammatory response. The interventions that have been implemented can be divided into those which have attempted to reduce the potential causes of damage and those aimed at reducing the impact by attempting to protect the brain. The evidence for three main types of intervention (equipment, techniques and drugs) is reviewed in this paper. Although many interventions are available only a few have shown a clear benefit. Progress in the future will require larger studies to address this multifactorial problem.
ACCESSION #
54537883

 

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