TITLE

DOING BUSINESS IN CHINA NOW As hard-liners and less-hard-liners struggle for political control, the economy seems headed for trouble. But Western investors are still betting on the long term

AUTHOR(S)
Worthy, Ford S.; Neumeier, Shelley
PUB. DATE
November 1989
SOURCE
Fortune;11/13/1989, p21
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
No abstract available.
ACCESSION #
54516730

 

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