TITLE

Physically Demanding Jobs and Occupational Injury and Disability in the U.S. Army

AUTHOR(S)
Hollander, Ilyssa E.; Bell, Nicole S.
PUB. DATE
October 2010
SOURCE
Military Medicine;Oct2010, Vol. 175 Issue 10, p705
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Effective job assignments should take into account physical capabilities to perform required tasks. Failure to do so is likely to result in increased injuries and musculoskeletal disability. Objective: To evaluate the association between job demands and health outcomes among U.S. Army soldiers. Methods: Multivariate Cox proportional hazards analysis is used to describe associations between job demands, hospitalizations, and disability among 261,096 enlisted Army soldiers in heavily, moderately, and lightly physically demanding occupations (2000-2005) who were followed for up to 5 years. Results: Controlling for gender, race, and age, soldiers in heavily demanding jobs were at increased risk for any-cause injury, on-duty injuries, any-cause hospitalizations, and any-cause disability, but not for musculoskeletal disability. Conclusion: Army job assignments should more accurately match physical capabilities to job demands and/or jobs should be redesigned to reduce injuries. Though musculoskeletal disorders are often the result of acute injury, the demographic and occupational risk patterns differ from acute injury.
ACCESSION #
54353617

 

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