TITLE

The President & the Press

PUB. DATE
October 1953
SOURCE
Time;10/26/1953, Vol. 62 Issue 17, p63
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article examines the relationship of U.S. President Dwight Eisenhower and the press. During his victory on January 1953, more than 80% of U.S. daily newpapers supported him and it is considered as the biggest newspaper backing for the government in the country's history. It was observed that top government officials were rarely interviewed by reporters, and were only available to bureau chiefs, columnists and publishers. Moreover, sensitive news stories result to conflicting structures due to limited information.
ACCESSION #
54174080

 

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