TITLE

The Omens

PUB. DATE
October 1952
SOURCE
Time;10/20/1952, Vol. 60 Issue 17, p33
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article focuses on the results of surveys of U.S. voters on which political parties and presidential candidates are preferred to win in the 1952 election. A Gallup poll revealed that 45% of respondents chose Republican Party while 38% selected Democratic and 17% of the surveyed voters were undecided. Based on a Crossley survey, Republican Dwight Eisenhower took a lead over Democratic Adlai Stevenson with the support of farmers in Minnesota, Iowa and Wisconsin.
ACCESSION #
54169583

 

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