TITLE

The Zarit Burden Interview: A New Short Version and Screening Version

AUTHOR(S)
Bedard, Michel; Molloy, D. William; Squire, Larry; Dubois, Sacha; Lever, Judith A.; O'Donnell, Martin
PUB. DATE
October 2001
SOURCE
Gerontologist;Oct2001, Vol. 41 Issue 5, p652
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Presents a study which developed a short and a screening version of the Zarit Burden Interview that would be suitable across diagnostic groups of cognitively impaired older adults. Methods; Results; Discussion.
ACCESSION #
5403407

Tags: COGNITION disorders in old age;  MEDICAL screening

 

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