TITLE

BIG BAD PHARMA: AN ETHICAL ANALYSIS OF PHYSICIAN-DIRECTED AND CONSUMER-DIRECTED MARKETING TACTICS

AUTHOR(S)
Connors, Amanda L.
PUB. DATE
February 2010
SOURCE
Albany Law Review;2010, Vol. 73 Issue 1, p243
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article discloses an ethical issue of pharmaceutical marketing styles that target consumers and doctors. Major pharmaceutical companies in the U.S. have been using promotional tactics including free medicine sample allocation, direct-to-consumer commercials, and offering gifts to doctors, which compromises the moral duties of the latter. Solutions are suggested to solve the moral issues in drug marketing including revealing the drug companies responsible for bribing medical workers and a web-based list of doctors listed by their behavior.
ACCESSION #
54020815

 

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