TITLE

ON RACE THEORY AND NORMS

AUTHOR(S)
Sundquist, Christian
PUB. DATE
November 2009
SOURCE
Albany Law Review;2009, Vol. 72 Issue 4, p953
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article addresses the judicial acceptance of DNA random match estimates, which is using DNA analysis to predict the possibility that a criminal defendant is the source of genetic material found at a crime scene that rely on race. It discusses a sketch of the historical development of the race concept. The author argues that racialized DNA estimates should be inadmissible under federal Rule 401 in the U.S.
ACCESSION #
53991578

 

Related Articles

  • BLACK AND WHITE OR RED ALL OVER? THE IMPROPRIETY OF USING CRIME SCENE DNA TO CONSTRUCT RACIAL PROFILES OF SUSPECTS. Quan, Natalie // Southern California Law Review;Sep2011, Vol. 84 Issue 6, p1403 

    The article discusses the role of DNA evidence obtained during crime scene searches in the construction of racial profiles of suspects in criminal investigations in the U.S. as of September 2011, focusing on an analysis of how DNA evidence is used by American law enforcement agencies, as well as...

  • DNA Can Be Falsified.  // New American (08856540);9/14/2009, Vol. 25 Issue 19, p6 

    The article reports on the results of a study published in the journal "Forensic Science International: Genetics" in the U.S. that examined the use of DNA as evidence of a crime scene. Dan Frumkin, lead author of the study, said that they could construct a sample DNA to match a DNA profile in a...

  • Edward Schwartz responds to Colin Miller. Schwartz, Edward P. // Jury Expert;Mar2010, Vol. 22 Issue 2, p70 

    The article presents the authors' reaction to the article on the application of Federal Rules of Evidence (FRE) 606 (b) to allegations of jurors' biases by Colin Miller. According to the author, he is not entirely persuaded that Miller's approach can circumvent the logic of Federal Rules of...

  • Julie Blackman & Ellen Brickman Respond To Colin Miller. Blackman, Julie; Brickman, Ellen // Jury Expert;Mar2010, Vol. 22 Issue 2, p72 

    The article presents the authors' reaction to the article on the application of Federal Rules of Evidence (FRE) 606 (b) to allegations of jurors' biases by Colin Miller. The authors argue that the recommendation of Miller that jurors need to be screened for prejudice during voir dire is...

  • PRELIMINARY REPORT ON RACE AND WASHINGTON'S CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM.  // Washington Law Review;Mar2012, Vol. 87 Issue 1, p1 

    The article presents the results of a report on race in the Washington criminal justice system as of March 2012, focusing on recommendations for promoting fairness and reducing racial disparity in the system. An alleged disproportionate representation of minority groups in the state's prison and...

  • Comparison of bacterial DNA profiles of footwear insoles and soles of feet for the forensic discrimination of footwear owners. Goga, Haruhisa // International Journal of Legal Medicine;Sep2012, Vol. 126 Issue 5, p815 

    It is crucial to identify the owner of unattended footwear left at a crime scene. However, retrieving enough DNA for DNA profiling from the owner's foot skin (plantar skin) cells from inside the footwear is often unsuccessful. This is sometimes because footwear that is used on a daily basis...

  • DNA 'FINGERPRINTS'.  // World Almanac for Kids;2003, p190 

    DNA is located in each of your cells, including your blood, saliva, hair follicles, and skin. No two people have DNA patterns that are exactly alike. Using skin or hair collected at a crime scene and samples from a suspect, scientists can analyze the makeup of the two sets of DNA. If they...

  • Forensic clock calls time on crimes. Randerson, James // New Scientist;11/27/2004, Vol. 184 Issue 2475, p12 

    The article presents information about a new technique that measures how quickly genetic material breaks. A stray hair, or a spatter of blood or saliva, is all it takes to prove that a suspect was at the scene of a crime. But until now, there was no way of knowing when the suspect was there, an...

  • Forensic DNA and bioinformatics. Bianchi, Lucia; LiÔ, Pietro // Briefings in Bioinformatics;Mar2007, Vol. 8 Issue 2, p117 

    The field of forensic science is increasingly based on biomolecular data and many European countries are establishing forensic databases to store DNA profiles of crime scenes of known offenders and apply DNA testing. The field is boosted by statistical and technological advances such as DNA...

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of VIRGINIA BEACH PUBLIC LIBRARY AND SYSTEM

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics