TITLE

Towards a fluorescent molecular switch for nucleic acid biosensing

AUTHOR(S)
Massey, Melissa; Krull, Ulrich J.
PUB. DATE
October 2010
SOURCE
Analytical & Bioanalytical Chemistry;Oct2010, Vol. 398 Issue 4, p1605
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
novel fluorescent molecular switch for the detection of nucleic acid hybridization has been explored in relation to the development of a structure that would be amenable for operation when immobilized for solid-phase analyses. The structure was prepared by self-assembly, and used Neutravidin as the central multivalent docking molecule, a newly synthesized biotinylated long-chain linker for intercalating dye that was modified with thiazole orange (TO) at one end, and a biotinylated probe oligonucleotide. Self-assembly of the biotinylated components on adjacent Neutravidin binding sites allowed for physical placement of an oligonucleotide probe molecule next to tethered TO. The TO located at the end of the flexible linker chain was available to intercalate, and could report if a duplex structure was formed by a probe-target interaction by means of fluorescence intensity. Subsequently, regeneration of the single-stranded probe was possible without loss of the intercalator to solution. The switch constructs were assembled in solution and subsequently immobilized onto biotin functionalized optical fibers to complete the sensor design. Solution-phase fluorescence lifetime data showed a biexponential behavior for switch constructs, suggesting intercalation as well as a significant secondary binding mode for the immobilized TO. It was found that the secondary binding mechanism for the dye to DNA could be decreased, thus shifting the dye to intercalative binding modes, by adjusting the solution conditions to a pH below the pI of Neutravidin, and by increasing the ionic strength of the buffer. Preliminary work demonstrated that it was possible to achieve up to a fivefold increase in fluorescence intensity on hybridization to the target.
ACCESSION #
53840399

 

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