TITLE

"A Moment to Be Seized"

PUB. DATE
June 1972
SOURCE
Time;6/12/1972, Vol. 99 Issue 24, p24
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article focuses on agreements between the Soviet Union and the U.S. in 1972 for the promotion of sound relations and peace. U.S. President Richard M. Nixon states that detente between the two countries has reduced the danger of a possible war. It also adds that U.S. and the Soviet Union agreed to lessen the proliferation of weapons and troops of each country in Hanoi, Vietnam. Moreover, it tells that agreements have led to more peaceful conditions in West Germany.
ACCESSION #
53810325

 

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