More perks please

Kondro, Wayne
August 2010
CMAJ: Canadian Medical Association Journal;8/10/2010, Vol. 182 Issue 11, pE525
Academic Journal
The article presents the result of the study that indicates vast majority of medical students and physicians in the U.S. have accorded on favour free industry lunches over large gift appropriations.


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