TITLE

ALL IN THE FAMILY: PRIVACY AND DNA FAMILIAL SEARCHING

AUTHOR(S)
Suter, Sonia M.
PUB. DATE
April 2010
SOURCE
Harvard Journal of Law & Technology;Spring2010, Vol. 23 Issue 2, p309
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article explores the significance and competing values in familial searching which has been a powerful tool in law enforcement. It discusses aspects of familial searching which is an extension of DNA profiling among family members and can be an admissible evidence on the court. It also explains the privacy and civil liberty concerns in the compulsory collection of DNA from convicted offenders and the specific regulatory scheme for the use of familial searching.
ACCESSION #
52650655

 

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