TITLE

RELATIONSHIP ADVICE: Good ethics can help you avoid the pitfalls of manager/vendor relations

AUTHOR(S)
Pharr, Karen
PUB. DATE
May 2010
SOURCE
Journal of Property Management;May/Jun2010, Vol. 75 Issue 3, p10
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article discusses how to help avoid pitfalls between manager and vendor. First, if the job requires someone with more experience, use the vendor best suited for the project. Next, there must be a quick remedy to uncertain situations when dealing with vendors. Lastly, the review of contracts will keep manager actively engaged with the client.
ACCESSION #
52465746

 

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