TITLE

Editorial

AUTHOR(S)
Ostovich, Helen; Gough, Melinda
PUB. DATE
June 2010
SOURCE
Early Theatre;2010, Vol. 13 Issue 1, p10
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article discusses various reports published within the issue, including one by Diane Jakacki on bibliographical concerns, one by Natalia Khomenko on normalizing injustices against other person and one by Ray Bossert on the rhetoric and political rebellion in the play by Sir Ralph Freeman.
ACCESSION #
52259446

 

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