TITLE

Dark days for medical profession in India

AUTHOR(S)
Collier, Roger
PUB. DATE
July 2010
SOURCE
CMAJ: Canadian Medical Association Journal;7/13/2010, Vol. 182 Issue 10, p1023
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article focuses on the corrupt practices in the medical profession in India. It mentions the arrest of Dr. Ketan Desai, president of the Medical Council of India, and colleagues by the Central Bureau of Investigation in India for their alleged roles in a 440,000 dollars bribery case on April 22, 2010. Dr. Subrata Chattopadhyay stresses the way of illegal payment to medical professors, wherein a 25% of salary in cash could be given to them without paying an income tax on the said portion.
ACCESSION #
52226597

 

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